These 50 must look at the medical app may be the next outlet (on)

Source: Internet
Author: User


Medical start-ups are highly competitive in their apps, including telemedicine, prescription management, physician decision support, patient portals and outpatient services.

Medical start-up company's app competition is fierce, including telemedicine, prescription management, doctor decision support, patient Portal and visiting service category, and so on, there are a wide range of vertical subdivision, we still can not know who will become the medical profession Uber. The following 50 app is one of the best, the author of the reorganization, comb its core advantages.

In view of the length of the full text, we will be divided into the next two articles to be reported, this article is the last chapter.

1 22otters (PALO ALTO, Calif.).

The Patient development platform 22otters is funded by Newans communications to simplify the medical service process through individual patient customization. The medical provider can input the information of the medicine into the app, and can also set the medication reminder for the patient. If the patient is in doubt about the treatment or forgets to take the pill, the provider can use the app to know the patient's time to perform a similar task, making the follow-up after discharge easier.

2. Amwell (Boston).

According to App Annie, the world's most popular tele-healthcare app in 2014, Amwell, a "healthy American" Company, provides remote contact services for clinicians and patients, including virtual waiting rooms, electronic prescriptions, online documentation, and proxy payments. It allows doctors to connect with their patients and access new patients through the online care group. The platform complies with the HIPAA Act (the Medical Electronic Exchange Act) and will train clinicians, develop clinical guidelines, and provide peer support.

3. ASKMD (Atlanta).

Sharecare company developed ASKMD, designed to establish a personal health history portal to share in-depth articles on user health. It uses Newans's voice recognition technology to store information about insurance, drugs, and preferred physicians, as well as to connect patients and experts to the question and answer service function.

4. Betterdoctor (San Francisco)

Betterdoctor is a collaborative application interface that helps consumers make more satisfying decisions about their health. Its founders focused on the transparency of the health care market. Doctors use their online platform to grow hands-on experience, and consumers can find nearby doctors by querying the algorithm for recommended outlets, education, and experience. The company values innovation and encourages developers to combine the use of their application portals to understand their complex datasets.

5. Blue Star (Baltimore).

WellDoc mobile App Bluestar is the first FDA-approved type 2 diabetes treatment that uses only prescription drugs. Bluestar can analyze the patient's diabetes data, including blood sugar levels. The software publishes aggregated data to provide analysis for patients ' healthcare teams and to develop self-management plans to help patients recover. Suzanne Clough, an endocrine biologist, found that in the 2005, WellDoc provided strong support for the daily life of diabetics.

6. Burnout Proof (Seattle).

This app, developed by Dike Drummond, who is called the "Dr. Happy Doctor", has been tested by doctors and contains a huge amount of resources and tools for one goal: reducing doctors ' job burnout. Burnout Proof chose a less favored category in the medical app, and guided "small training" by meditation and imagination for office users to help doctors cope with stress and tiredness in medical events, enriching doctors ' experience.

7. CareConnect (Jacksonville, Fla.).

The CareConnect, developed by the Nemo Children's Hospital, is the world's first tele-medical mobile app that focuses on pediatrics. The app can have 24-hour face-to-face counseling with pediatricians to answer questions about their children's treatment without having to take them to the emergency room. With a 49-dollar visit, Nemo can address a range of routine emergency care issues. In addition, clinicians can use careconnect to prescribe electronic prescriptions.

8. Carezone (San Francisco).

A regular doctor's procedure produces a lot of paper lists, Carezone provides a platform to store and manage relevant bills, documents, and date of appointment, helping patients avoid these disorders. The app can be used to manage the medical situation of individual or family members, and will automatically update medical information, related health information, and organize medical records to view the latest information of others.

9. Dispatch Health (Denver).

Dispatch Health app users enjoy a few mobile emergency treatment teams, press the button, they will be sent to cure. The Dispatch health team is equipped with qualified laboratory equipment, drugs, interactive video systems and wireless networks that can handle a number of routine situations, such as minor fractures, urinary tract infections and wound dressings. The company receives most of the local insurance and treats the uninsured patients with parity. At present, Dispatch Health is only available in Denver, but the company plans to promote it to other cities.

Docphin (New York).

One of the daily challenges facing doctors is to catch up with the latest research and related discussions in their fields. Docphin solves this problem by sifting through the contents of the doctor's attention and sending it directly to their cell phone or tablet computer. The app is able to record user preferences, push Professional and thematic journal articles, authors, and free PDF documents. In addition, users can choose to subscribe to additional paid services for in-depth hints and retrieval.

Doctor on Demand (San Francisco).

Doctor on Demand offers patients a remote medical access to a computer or cell phone for a fee of 40 dollars at a time. In addition to internal medicine and paediatric treatment, the app will also provide a 25-50-minute psychological seminar and breastfeeding counseling. According to Rock Health's ranking, doctor on Demand has entered the top 50 of the fastest-growing digital medical company.

Doximity (San Francisco).

More than 60% of American doctors are enrolled in Doximity's membership, and for three years, its vertical social network is larger than the American Medical Association. The company's goal is to design a simple and responsive tool to ease the pressure of doctors by collecting problems from the user base and from the need for improved solutions. Users use Doximity to send a fax that complies with HIPAA law, create an interest community, gather relevant information, track the Chicago Mercantile Exchange articles, and find jobs.

Epocrates (SAN Mateo, Calif.).

In the study of "The Pulse of Manhattan Research," Epocrates is at the top of America's list of healthcare-related apps. Epocrates provides doctors with clinical practice guidelines, convenient billing codes and drug information. The app is part of the athenahealth, with a prescription drug interaction check function that includes a peer disease review database and drug safety information. Epocrates combines the athenahealth's exercise heart rate recording function, allowing physicians to give reminders to patients.

Everseat (Baltimore).

In an era when smartphones make services easier, medical appointments remain at the stage of making many calls to customers to confirm information. Everseat aims to address this problem from both the physician and consumer terminals by allowing medical providers to mark open windows in their schedules and informing patients of more window opening hours. Users can use this app to find and schedule appointments, collect favorite medical sites, and find out where the nearest hospital is located. Earlier this year, Everseat and Athenahealth agreed that medical providers could implement its program on the supplier's network.

Faircare (San Francisco).

Consumers are puzzled by whether their treatment costs are a fair market price, and faircare can solve the problem. In addition to connecting the national price database with suppliers, the app also encourages users to share their treatment expenses anonymously, which can provide a reference for other people's choices. Faircare also allows users to find doctors and hospitals based on their location. Currently, the app is free to use.

Figure 1 (Toronto).

Known as the "Doctor's Instragram", Figure-1 is a free app. Doctors can use it to share medical cases based on educational or collaborative purposes. The doctor uploaded a picture of the app that all Figure-1 users could see and comment on. The app can also share medical journals with photos or other educational sites, in which users will be notified of what they are uploading and can choose whether to read them or not. All photographs are subject to the consent of the patient, and any details, including pictures, or patient information are protected, and pictures of the exposure details are not allowed to be released.

Followmyhealth Mobile (Chicago).

The Followmyhealth mobile app, developed by Allscripts, allows users to use their EHR mobile versions on smartphones and matching devices. The app, in collaboration with Apple Health, will automatically update information on blood pressure, weight change, and glucose readings. Followmyhealth also has other functions, such as billing, prescription requests, appointment management, and safe two-way communication with physicians.

Formulary Search (Yardley, Penn.).

Formulary Search contains new medical prescriptions and more than 6,000 U.S. health programs, which allows users to quickly find out about drug status and restrictions. The app's goal is to provide professional and efficient drug and related financial prescription decision information. Recently, Formulary search has updated the retrieval of alternative therapies and their related information.

Heal (SANTA Monica, Calif.).

Heal is a mobile medical application that can push doctors everywhere. When a patient is sick, healthy, wants to do a checkup, or needs a basic care physician, just send a request, and Heal's doctor can provide the service. Patients who have not insured have to pay 99 dollar parity fee and 8:00-20:00 online 7 days a week.

Healow (Westborough, Mass.).

"Healthcare online," created by Eclinicalworks, for short Healow, allows users to obtain data from all medical providers in one place, one of which is to gather information from numerous electronic health records. Users can transfer data between medical providers and view their medical records. In addition, the app also has an appointment and prescription management function.

HealthLoop (MOUNTAIN View, Calif.).

With the design intention of communicating with the greatest possible efficiency, HEALTHLOOP provides doctors and patients with a range of tools to maintain a high level of communication. The app's automatic check-in function can supervise and guide patients to improve drug compliance and ensure that the hospital receives a controllable feedback. HealthLoop supports the addition of independent practitioners, multiple professional groups or medical systems, incorporating the app's functions into all types of medical care. Through automated follow-up care, the app is designed to allow physicians and patients to communicate during a visit.

HealthTap (San Francisco).

HealthTap provides a mobile guide with more than 1.3 million physicians, where users can get in touch with doctors anywhere, or use the installment plan for video and text counseling. Doctors who use the app can refer to expert experience, lab tests, and remote electronic prescriptions. In addition, other features include thousands of customized personal lists for medical, lifestyle, and pain management. With this app, users can safely share data with their physicians and receive customized care tips, programs, and related daily information.

Human Dx (San Francisco).

A team from San Francisco is planning to put all the world's health problems into the genome database through the Human Diagnostics program. They developed application Humandx to collect information about patients and clinical cases. Clinicians can use the application to query colleagues and the entire medical community for insights, apply expertise to cases and treatments, speed up the learning process and store anonymous data for reference and use. Users can update specific cases and view cases uploaded by others to provide a reference for complex diagnostics.

Icdeasy (New York).

Icdeasy can reduce a doctor's workload by outputting the corresponding ICD-10 code after the doctor enters the ICD-9 code. The software, priced at $5.99, integrates three types of code generation translation devices, and can search for code by entering keywords and chapters in addition to the existing ICD9 version. Software-generated code covers a variety of types, and its search capabilities can even be used without WiFi, such as restricted access zones or offline hospitals.

Isabel (ANN Arbor, Mich.).

Isabel is a local symptom test, a partial database and a clinical decision support tool through which medical staff can enter the online system to help them make accurate diagnoses faster. After entering patient information, the program will develop a list of all possible diagnoses to help the medical staff make accurate judgments and then seek appropriate treatment. Developers say the application can also serve as an educational platform to provide clinicians with knowledge to help them get more accurate diagnoses.


This article is reproduced from other sites, does not represent the health sector perspective. Medical start-ups are highly competitive in their apps, including telemedicine, prescription management, physician decision support, patient portals and outpatient services.

Medical start-up company's app competition is fierce, including telemedicine, prescription management, doctor decision support, patient Portal and visiting service category, and so on, there are a wide range of vertical subdivision, we still can not know who will become the medical profession Uber. The following 50 app is one of the best, the author of the reorganization, comb its core advantages.

In view of the length of the full text, we will be divided into the next two articles to be reported, this article is the last chapter.

1 22otters (PALO ALTO, Calif.).

The Patient development platform 22otters is funded by Newans communications to simplify the medical service process through individual patient customization. The medical provider can input the information of the medicine into the app, and can also set the medication reminder for the patient. If the patient is in doubt about the treatment or forgets to take the pill, the provider can use the app to know the patient's time to perform a similar task, making the follow-up after discharge easier.

2. Amwell (Boston).

According to App Annie, the world's most popular tele-healthcare app in 2014, Amwell, a "healthy American" Company, provides remote contact services for clinicians and patients, including virtual waiting rooms, electronic prescriptions, online documentation, and proxy payments. It allows doctors to connect with their patients and access new patients through the online care group. The platform complies with the HIPAA Act (the Medical Electronic Exchange Act) and will train clinicians, develop clinical guidelines, and provide peer support.

3. ASKMD (Atlanta).

Sharecare company developed ASKMD, designed to establish a personal health history portal to share in-depth articles on user health. It uses Newans's voice recognition technology to store information about insurance, drugs, and preferred physicians, as well as to connect patients and experts to the question and answer service function.

4. Betterdoctor (San Francisco)

Betterdoctor is a collaborative application interface that helps consumers make more satisfying decisions about their health. Its founders focused on the transparency of the health care market. Doctors use their online platform to grow hands-on experience, and consumers can find nearby doctors by querying the algorithm for recommended outlets, education, and experience. The company values innovation and encourages developers to combine the use of their application portals to understand their complex datasets.

5. Blue Star (Baltimore).

WellDoc mobile App Bluestar is the first FDA-approved type 2 diabetes treatment that uses only prescription drugs. Bluestar can analyze the patient's diabetes data, including blood sugar levels. The software publishes aggregated data to provide analysis for patients ' healthcare teams and to develop self-management plans to help patients recover. Suzanne Clough, an endocrine biologist, found that in the 2005, WellDoc provided strong support for the daily life of diabetics.

6. Burnout Proof (Seattle).

This app, developed by Dike Drummond, who is called the "Dr. Happy Doctor", has been tested by doctors and contains a huge amount of resources and tools for one goal: reducing doctors ' job burnout. Burnout Proof chose a less favored category in the medical app, and guided "small training" by meditation and imagination for office users to help doctors cope with stress and tiredness in medical events, enriching doctors ' experience.

7. CareConnect (Jacksonville, Fla.).

The CareConnect, developed by the Nemo Children's Hospital, is the world's first tele-medical mobile app that focuses on pediatrics. The app can have 24-hour face-to-face counseling with pediatricians to answer questions about their children's treatment without having to take them to the emergency room. With a 49-dollar visit, Nemo can address a range of routine emergency care issues. In addition, clinicians can use careconnect to prescribe electronic prescriptions.

8. Carezone (San Francisco).

A regular doctor's procedure produces a lot of paper lists, Carezone provides a platform to store and manage relevant bills, documents, and date of appointment, helping patients avoid these disorders. The app can be used to manage the medical situation of individual or family members, and will automatically update medical information, related health information, and organize medical records to view the latest information of others.

9. Dispatch Health (Denver).

Dispatch Health app users enjoy a few mobile emergency treatment teams, press the button, they will be sent to cure. The Dispatch health team is equipped with qualified laboratory equipment, drugs, interactive video systems and wireless networks that can handle a number of routine situations, such as minor fractures, urinary tract infections and wound dressings. The company receives most of the local insurance and treats the uninsured patients with parity. At present, Dispatch Health is only available in Denver, but the company plans to promote it to other cities.

Docphin (New York).

One of the daily challenges facing doctors is to catch up with the latest research and related discussions in their fields. Docphin solves this problem by sifting through the contents of the doctor's attention and sending it directly to their cell phone or tablet computer. The app is able to record user preferences, push Professional and thematic journal articles, authors, and free PDF documents. In addition, users can choose to subscribe to additional paid services for in-depth hints and retrieval.

Doctor on Demand (San Francisco).

Doctor on Demand offers patients a remote medical access to a computer or cell phone for a fee of 40 dollars at a time. In addition to internal medicine and paediatric treatment, the app will also provide a 25-50-minute psychological seminar and breastfeeding counseling. According to Rock Health's ranking, doctor on Demand has entered the top 50 of the fastest-growing digital medical company.

Doximity (San Francisco).

More than 60% of American doctors are enrolled in Doximity's membership, and for three years, its vertical social network is larger than the American Medical Association. The company's goal is to design a simple and responsive tool to ease the pressure of doctors by collecting problems from the user base and from the need for improved solutions. Users use Doximity to send a fax that complies with HIPAA law, create an interest community, gather relevant information, track the Chicago Mercantile Exchange articles, and find jobs.

Epocrates (SAN Mateo, Calif.).

In the study of "The Pulse of Manhattan Research," Epocrates is at the top of America's list of healthcare-related apps. Epocrates provides doctors with clinical practice guidelines, convenient billing codes and drug information. The app is part of the athenahealth, with a prescription drug interaction check function that includes a peer disease review database and drug safety information. Epocrates combines the athenahealth's exercise heart rate recording function, allowing physicians to give reminders to patients.

Everseat (Baltimore).

In an era when smartphones make services easier, medical appointments remain at the stage of making many calls to customers to confirm information. Everseat aims to address this problem from both the physician and consumer terminals by allowing medical providers to mark open windows in their schedules and informing patients of more window opening hours. Users can use this app to find and schedule appointments, collect favorite medical sites, and find out where the nearest hospital is located. Earlier this year, Everseat and Athenahealth agreed that medical providers could implement its program on the supplier's network.

Faircare (San Francisco).

Consumers are puzzled by whether their treatment costs are a fair market price, and faircare can solve the problem. In addition to connecting the national price database with suppliers, the app also encourages users to share their treatment expenses anonymously, which can provide a reference for other people's choices. Faircare also allows users to find doctors and hospitals based on their location. Currently, the app is free to use.

Figure 1 (Toronto).

Known as the "Doctor's Instragram", Figure-1 is a free app. Doctors can use it to share medical cases based on educational or collaborative purposes. The doctor uploaded a picture of the app that all Figure-1 users could see and comment on. The app can also share medical journals with photos or other educational sites, in which users will be notified of what they are uploading and can choose whether to read them or not. All photographs are subject to the consent of the patient, and any details, including pictures, or patient information are protected, and pictures of the exposure details are not allowed to be released.

Followmyhealth Mobile (Chicago).

The Followmyhealth mobile app, developed by Allscripts, allows users to use their EHR mobile versions on smartphones and matching devices. The app, in collaboration with Apple Health, will automatically update information on blood pressure, weight change, and glucose readings. Followmyhealth also has other functions, such as billing, prescription requests, appointment management, and safe two-way communication with physicians.

Formulary Search (Yardley, Penn.).

Formulary Search contains new medical prescriptions and more than 6,000 U.S. health programs, which allows users to quickly find out about drug status and restrictions. The app's goal is to provide professional and efficient drug and related financial prescription decision information. Recently, Formulary search has updated the retrieval of alternative therapies and their related information.

Heal (SANTA Monica, Calif.).

Heal is a mobile medical application that can push doctors everywhere. When a patient is sick, healthy, wants to do a checkup, or needs a basic care physician, just send a request, and Heal's doctor can provide the service. Patients who have not insured have to pay 99 dollar parity fee and 8:00-20:00 online 7 days a week.

Healow (Westborough, Mass.).

"Healthcare online," created by Eclinicalworks, for short Healow, allows users to obtain data from all medical providers in one place, one of which is to gather information from numerous electronic health records. Users can transfer data between medical providers and view their medical records. In addition, the app also has an appointment and prescription management function.

HealthLoop (MOUNTAIN View, Calif.).

With the design intention of communicating with the greatest possible efficiency, HEALTHLOOP provides doctors and patients with a range of tools to maintain a high level of communication. The app's automatic check-in function can supervise and guide patients to improve drug compliance and ensure that the hospital receives a controllable feedback. HealthLoop supports the addition of independent practitioners, multiple professional groups or medical systems, incorporating the app's functions into all types of medical care. Through automated follow-up care, the app is designed to allow physicians and patients to communicate during a visit.

HealthTap (San Francisco).

HealthTap provides a mobile guide with more than 1.3 million physicians, where users can get in touch with doctors anywhere, or use the installment plan for video and text counseling. Doctors who use the app can refer to expert experience, lab tests, and remote electronic prescriptions. In addition, other features include thousands of customized personal lists for medical, lifestyle, and pain management. With this app, users can safely share data with their physicians and receive customized care tips, programs, and related daily information.

Human Dx (San Francisco).

A team from San Francisco is planning to put all the world's health problems into the genome database through the Human Diagnostics program. They developed application Humandx to collect information about patients and clinical cases. Clinicians can use the application to query colleagues and the entire medical community for insights, apply expertise to cases and treatments, speed up the learning process and store anonymous data for reference and use. Users can update specific cases and view cases uploaded by others to provide a reference for complex diagnostics.

Icdeasy (New York).

Icdeasy can reduce a doctor's workload by outputting the corresponding ICD-10 code after the doctor enters the ICD-9 code. The software, priced at $5.99, integrates three types of code generation translation devices, and can search for code by entering keywords and chapters in addition to the existing ICD9 version. Software-generated code covers a variety of types, and its search capabilities can even be used without WiFi, such as restricted access zones or offline hospitals.

Isabel (ANN Arbor, Mich.).

Isabel is a local symptom test, a partial database and a clinical decision support tool through which medical staff can enter the online system to help them make accurate diagnoses faster. After entering patient information, the program will develop a list of all possible diagnoses to help the medical staff make accurate judgments and then seek appropriate treatment. Developers say the application can also serve as an educational platform to provide clinicians with knowledge to help them get more accurate diagnoses.


This article is reproduced from other sites, does not represent the health sector perspective.

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