Java EE 6 authoritative guide: Version 4th. BASICS (Oracle Java EE 6 documentation team members accurately explain the Java EE 6 platform)

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Java EE 6 authoritative guide: Version 4th. BASICS (Oracle Java EE 6 documentation team members accurately explain the Java EE 6 platform)
Basic Information
Original Title: the Java EE 6 Tutorial: basic concepts, Fourth Edition
Author: (US) jendrock (E.) [Translator's introduction]
Translator: Li Peng Han Zhi translated
Series name: Turing programming Series
Press: People's post and telecommunications Press
ISBN: 9787115290434
Mounting time:
Published on: February 1, August 2012
Start: 16
Page number: 1
Version: 1-1
Category: Computer

For more information, Java EE 6 authoritative guide: Version 4th. BASICS (Oracle Java EE 6 documentation team members accurately explain the Java EE 6 platform)
Content Overview books
Computer books
Java EE 6 authoritative guide: Version 4th. this is a task-oriented and example-driven basic tutorial on Java EE 6. It describes how to develop enterprise applications and adds a lot of new content as part of version 4th, the latest API and platform features are described in detail. This book describes Java EE 6 basic knowledge, web layer technology (including JavaServer faces and facelets) in eight parts ), and how to use JAX-WS and jax-rs to build Web Services, use JavaBeans components to develop business logic, use Java persistence APIs to access databases, enhance security for Web applications or enterprise applications, and the platform uses context and dependency injection.
Java EE 6 authoritative guide: Version 4th. basics is suitable for beginners and intermediate Java programmers.
Directory
Java EE 6 authoritative guide: Version 4th. Basics
Introduction
Chapter 2 Summary 2
1.1 New Features of Java EE 6 platform 3
1.2 Java EE application model 3
1.3 distributed multi-tier application 4
1.3.1 Security 5
1.3.2 Java EE component 5
1.3.3 Java EE Client 5
1.3.4 Web Component 7
1.3.5 business component 8
1.3.6 enterprise information system layer 9
1.4 Java EE container 9
1.4.1 Container service 10
1.4.2 container type 10
1.5 web service support 11
1.5.1 XML 12
1.5.2 soap Transmission Protocol 12
1.5.3 standard WSDL format 12
1.6 Java EE application assembly and deployment 13
1.7 package an application 13
1.8 division of roles in development 14
1.8.1 Java EE product provider 15
1.8.2 tool provider 15
1.8.3 Application Component provider 15
1.8.4 application assembler 15
1.8.5 application deployer and administrator 16
1.9 Java EE 6 API 16
1.9.1 Enterprise JavaBeans Technology 19
1.9.2 Java Servlet technology 20
1.9.3 assumerver faces technology 20
1.9.4 assumerver Pages technology 20
1.9.5 assumerver pages standard tag library 21
1.9.6 Java persistence API 21
1.9.7 Java transaction API 21
1.9.8 Java APIs supporting restful Web Services 21
1.9.9 managed beans 21
1.9.10 Java EE platform (JSR 299) Context and dependency injection 22
1.9.11 Java dependency injection (JSR 330) 22
1.9.12 bean validation 22
1.9.13 Java Message Service API 22
1.9.14 Java EE Connector Architecture 22
1.9.15 javamail API 23
1.9.16 Java container authorization contract 23
1.9.17 Java container authentication service provider interface 23
Java ee6 API 23 in 1.10 Java Standard Edition 6.0
1.10.1 Java Database connectivityapi 24
1.10.2 Java Naming and Directory Interface API 24
1.10.3 JavaBeans activationframework 24
1.10.4 Java xml api 24
1.10.5 Java XML binding architecture 25
1.10.6 support SOAP message API with attachments 25
1.10.7 XML-based Java WebServices API 25
1.10.8 Java authentication and authorization service 25
1.11 glassfish server tools 26
Chapter 2 tutorial 27
2.1 required software 27
2.1.1 Java platform Standard Edition (j2se) 27
2.1.2 Java EE 6 SDK 28
2.1.3 Java EE 6 tutorial component 28
2.1.4 netbeans integrated development environment 29
2.1.5 Apache ant 30
2.2 start and close the glassfish server 30
2.3 start the Management Console 31
2.4 start and close the java db Server 32
2.5 build example 32
2.6 Tutorial example directory structure 32
2.7 Get the latest version of tutorial 33
2.8 debug Java EE application 33
2.8.1 server log 33
2.8.2 debugger 34
Part 2 web layer
Chapter 1 Preliminary web application 36
3.1 web application 36
3.2 web application lifecycle 37
3.3 web module example -- hello1 39
3.3.1 Analysis of hello1 web module 40
3.3.2 package web module 42
3.3.3 deploy web module 43
3.3.4 run the deployed Web module 44
3.3.5 view deployed web modules 44
3.3.6 update the web module 45
3.3.7 dynamic loading 45
3.3.8 uninstall the web module 46
3.4 hello2 example 46
3.4.1 ing URLs to Web Components 46
3.4.2 hello2web module analysis 47
3.4.3 build, package, deploy, and run
Hello2 application 48
3.4.4 set the welcome file 49
3.4.5 set context and initialization parameters 49
3.4.6 ing error information to error page 50
3.4.7 resource reference statement 51
3.5 more information about Web applications 52
Chapter 4 JSF technology 54
4.1 what is a JSF application 54
4.2 advantages of JSF technology 55
4.3 create a simple JSF application 56
4.3.1 development backend bean 57
4.3.2 create web page 57
4.3.3 facing facesservlet instance 58
4.3.4 life cycle of the hello application 58
4.4 more information about JSF technology 59
Chapter 1 facelets introduction 60
5.1 What is facelets 60
5.2 simple facelets Application Development 61
5.2.1 create facelets Application 61
5.2.2 configure the application 64
5.2.3 build, package, deploy, and run guessnumber facelets example 65
5.3 templated 66
5.4 composite components 68
5.5 Resource 70
Chapter 2 Expression Language 72
6.1 El summary 72
6.2 syntax 73
6.2.1 Instant Evaluation 73
6.2.2 deferred evaluation 73
6.3 value expression and Method Expression 74
6.3.1 value expression 74
6.3.2 Method Expression 77
6.4 define tag property type 79
6.5 text expression 80
6.6 operator 80
6.7 reserved words 81
6.8 El expression example 81
Chapter 4 Use JSF Technology in webpages 83
7.1 setting page 83
7.2 use HTML tags to add components to the page 84
7.2.1 general attributes of component labels 85
7.2.2 add HTML head and body labels 87
7.2.3 add form component 88
7.2.4 Text Component 88
7.2.5 use the Command component label to execute actions and navigation 92
7.2.6 use H: graphicimage to add images and images 93
7.2.7 use H: panelgrid and H: panelgroup to implement component layout 93
7.2.8 display option component 94
7.2.9 show multiple choice components 96
7.2.10 use the F: selectitem and F: selectitems labels 97
7.2.11 use the data binding table component 98
7.2.12 use H: Message and H: messages to Display Error information 101
7.2.13 use the H: button and H: link tags to create a URL 102 that can be added to favorites
7.2.14 use view parameter configuration to add the URL 102 to favorites
7.2.15 use the H: Output tag to locate the resource. 103
7.3 core tag 104
Chapter 2 converters, listeners, and validators 8th
8.1 standard converter 106
8.1.1 conversion component value 107
8.1.2 datetimeconverter 108
8.1.3 numberconverter 109
8.2 register the listener for the component 110
8.2.1 register a value change listener for the component 110
8.2.2 register the action listener for the component 111
8.3 standard validators 111
8.3.1 verification component value 112
8.3.2 longrange validator 112
8.4 method of referencing backend bean 112
8.4.1 Method for referencing and executing the page navigation 113
8.4.2 reference method for handling action events 113
8.4.3 Method for referencing the verification logic 114
8.4.4 reference the method for handling value change events 114
Chapter 2 development of Web applications with JSF technology 9th
9.1 backend bean 115
9.1.1 create backend bean 115
9.1.2 use el to reference backend bean 116
9.2 write code 117 for the attributes of the backend Bean
9.2.1 write code 118 for the property bound to the component Value
9.2.2 write code 122 For the attributes bound to the component instance
9.2.3 write code 123 For the attributes bound to the converter, listener, and validators
9.3 compile code 124 for the background bean Method
9.3.1 how to write and process navigation 124
9.3.2 Method for compiling Action events 125
9.3.3 method 126 for compiling Verification
9.3.4 Method for compiling a value change event 126
9.4 use bean verification 127
Chapter 2 Java Servlet technology 10th
10.1 what is servlet 130
10.2 servlet lifecycle 131
10.2.1 process events in the servlet lifecycle 131
10.2.2 handling servlet error 132
10.3 share information 132
10.3.1 objects with scope 133
10.3.2 control concurrent access to shared resources by 133
10.4 create and initialize servlet 133
10.5 service method 134
10.5.1 extract information from the request 134
10.5.2 construct response 135
10.6 filter requests and responses 136
10.6.1 implement filter 136 by programming
10.6.2 custom requests and responses through programming 137
10.6.3 set filter ing 138
10.7 call other Web Resources 139
10.7.1 include other resources in the response 139
10.7.2 transfer control to other Web Components 140
10.8 access web context 140
10.9 maintain client status 140
10.9.1 Access session 141
10.9.2 associate an object with session 141
10.9.3 session management 141
10.9.4 session tracking 142
10.10 end servlet 142
10.10.1 Tracing Service Request 142
10.10.2 will disable event notification method 143
10.10.3 proper handling of long term method 143
10.11 mood sample application 144
10.11.1 components in the mood sample application 144
10.11.2 mood example 144
10.12 more information about Java Servlet 145
Part 3 Web Services
Chapter 2 Web Services 11th
11.1 what is Web service 148
11.2 web service type 148
11.2.1 "heavyweight" web service 148
11.2.2 rest Web Service 149
11.3 web service type selection 150
Chapter 4 using JAX-WS to build Web Services 12th
12.1 Use Jax-ws to develop simple web services and clients 152
12.1.1 152 requirements on the Jax-ws endpoint
12.1.2 write service endpoint implementation class 153
12.1.3 build, package and deploy services 153
12.1.4 Method for Testing web service endpoints 154
12.1.5 simple JAX-WS application client 155
12.1.6 simple jax-wsweb client 156
12.2 types supported by Jax-WS: 159
12.3 Web Service interoperability and Jax-ws 159
12.4 more information about Jax-ws 159
Chapter 2 using jax-rs to build a restful Web Service 13th
13.1 what is restful Web Service 160
13.2 create a restful root Resource class 161
13.2.1 use jax-rs to develop restful Web Services 161
13.2.2 jax-rs application overview 162
13.2.3 @ path annotation and URI path template 163
13.2.4 respond to HTTP resource 165
13.2.5 use @ consumes and @ produces to customize the request and response 167
13.2.6 extract parameter 169 from request
13.3 example application of Jax-Rs 172
13.3.1 rest web service 172
13.3.2 RSVP sample application 174
13.3.3 real example 176
13.4 more information about Jax-Rs 176
Part 4 enterprise Bean
Chapter 2 enterprise Bean 14th
14.1 what is enterprise Bean 180
14.1.1 advantages of using enterprise Bean 180
14.1.2 when to use enterprise Bean 181
14.1.3 type of enterprise Bean 181
14.2 what is session bean 181
14.2.1 type of Session Bean 181
14.2.2 when to use Session Bean 182
14.3 what is message-driven bean 183
14.3.1 difference between message-driven bean and Session Bean 183
14.3.2 when to use the message-driven bean 184
14.4 Access enterprise Bean 184
14.4.1 use enterprise Bean 185 on the client
14.4.2 remote or local access 185
14.4.3 local client 186
14.4.4 remote client 187
14.4.5 web service client 188
14.4.6 access to method parameters and Methods 189
14.5 enterprise Bean content 189
14.5.1 package the enterprise Bean 189 in the jar module of EJB
14.5.2 package the enterprise Bean 190 in the war Module
14.6 enterprise Bean naming rules 191
14.7 enterprise Bean lifecycle 191
14.7.1 191 lifecycle of stateful Session Bean
14.7.2 192 lifecycle of stateless Session Bean
14.7.3 life cycle of a single-piece Session Bean: 193
14.7.4 message-driven bean 193 Lifecycle
14.8 more about enterprise Bean 194
Chapter 2 enterprise Bean application 15th
15.1 Create enterprise Bean 195
15.1.1 write enterprise Bean class 195
15.1.2 create a converter Web Client 196
15.1.3 build, package, deploy and run converter example 197
15.2 modify Java EE application 198
Chapter 2 example of running enterprise Bean 16th
16.1 cart example 200
16.1.1 business interface 201
16.1.2 Session Bean 201
16.1.3 @ Remove Method 204
16.1.4 helper class 204
16.1.5 example of building, packaging, deploying and running cart 204
16.2 single-piece Session Bean example counter 206
16.2.1 create a single-piece Session Bean 206
16.2.2 counter example architecture 209
16.2.3 example of building, packaging, deploying, and running counter 211
16.3 web service example helloservice 212
16.3.1 implementation class 212 of web service endpoints
16.3.2 implementation class 213 of stateless Session Bean
16.3.3 helloservice example 213
16.4 use timer service 214
16.4.1 create a calendar-type timer expression 215
16.4.2 programmable timer 217
16.4.3 automatic timer 218
16.4.4 cancel and save the timer 219
16.4.5 obtain timer information 219
16.4.6 transactions and timer 219
16.4.7 example of timersession 219
16.4.8 timersession example 221
16.5 handle exceptions 222
Part 5 context and dependency injection of the Java EE platform
Chapter 2 Introduction to context and dependency injection on the Java EE platform 17th
17.1 CDI overview 227
17.2 about Bean 227
17.3 about managed bean 228
17.4 injected object bean 228
17.5 use limit word 229
17.6 inject bean 230
17.7 use scope 230
17.8 set El name 231 for bean
17.9 increase access method 232
17.10 use managed bean 232 on the facelets page
17.11 inject an object using the producer Method 233
17.12 configure the CDI application 233
17.13 more information about CDI 234
Chapter 2 simple context and dependency injection example 18th
18.1 CDI example simplegreeting 235
18.1.1 source file 235 of simplegreeting
18.1.2 facelets template and 236 page
18.1.3 configuration file 237
18.1.4 construct, package, deploy, and run the CDI example simplegreeting 237
18.2 CDI example guessnumber 239
18.2.1 source file 239 of guessnumber
18.2.2 facelets 243
18.2.3 build, package, deploy, and run the CDI example guessnumber 244
Part 6 persistence
Chapter 2 Java persistence API introduction 19th
19.1 entity 248
19.1.1 requirement for entity classes 248
19.1.2 persistence fields and attributes of the object class 249
19.1.3 primary key 253 in an object
19.1.4 diversity of Object Relations 254
255 object link direction
256 embedding classes in entities
19.2 entity inheritance 257
19.2.1 abstract entity 257
19.2.2 ing superclass 258
19.2.3 non-entity supercategory 258
19.2.4 Object Inheritance ing policy 259
19.3 management entity 261
19.3.1 entitymanager API 261
19.3.2 persistent unit 264
19.4 querying entities 265
19.5 more information about persistence 266
Chapter 2 example of running persistence 20th
20.1 Order application 267
Limit 1.1 Entity Relation 267 in order example
1.2 primary key 269 in order Application
4.1.1.3 ing the entity 272 of multiple database tables
Cascade 1.4 cascade operations in the Order application 272
Blob and clob types in the 273 Order application
Limit 1.6 The time type in the Order application is 273
Lifecycle 1.7 manage entity 273 in order Application
4.1.1.8 build, package, deploy, and run the Order application 275
20.2 roster application 276
Ipv2.1 relationship 276 in the roster Application
Limit 2.2 Object Inheritance relationships in the roster application 277
Criteria query 278 in roster
Ipv2.4 automatic table creation in the roster application 280
4.1.2.5 build, package, deploy, and run a roster application 280
20.3 address-book application 282
Constraint 3.1 bean validation constraints in address-book applications 282
Lifecycle 3.2 specifies the error message 283 for the constraints in the address-book application
4.1.3.3 verify the contact data entered in the JSF application: 283
2.163.4 build, package, deploy, and run the address-book application 284
Chapter 2 Java persistence Query Language 21st
21.1 query language terminology 286
21.2 create a query using the Java persistence Query Language 287
21.2.1 named parameter 287 in the query
21.2.2 location parameter 288 in the query
21.3 brief query language syntax 288
21.3.1 select the statement 288
21.3.2 update and delete statement 289
21.4 query example 289
21.4.1 simple query 289
21.4.2 you need to locate the query of the relevant entity 290
21.4.3 use other conditional expressions for query 291
21.4.4 batch update and delete 292
21.5 query language syntax 293
21.5.1 BNF 293
21.5.2 BNF syntax of the Java persistence Query Language 293
21.5.3 from statement 297
21.5.4 path expression 300
21.5.5 where statement 301
21.5.6 SELECT statement 309
21.5.7 order by statement 310
21.5.8 group by and having clauses 311
Chapter 2 construct a query using the criteria API 22nd
22.1 criteria and metamodel API overview 312
22.2 use metamodel API to model object classes 313
22.3 use criteria API and metamodel API to create basic type security queries 314
22.3.1 create a criteria query 315
22.3.2 query root 315
22.3.3 use join to query associations 316
22.3.4 locate the path 316 in the criteria Query
22.3.5 filter criteria query result 317
22.3.6 handling criteria query result 319
22.3.7 query 320
Part 7 Security
Chapter 2 Java EE platform security entry 23rd
23.1 Java EE security overview 322
23.1.1 simple security example 323
23.1.2 Security Mechanism features 325
23.1.3 application security features 325
23.2 Security Mechanism 326
23.2.1 Java SE Security 326
23.2.2 Java EE Security 327
23.3 increase the container security by 329
23.3.1 add 329 security for applications with annotations
23.3.2 use the deployment description file to increase application security by 329
23.3.3 use a programmatic Security Mechanism 330
23.4 enhanced security 330 for glassfish servers
23.5 use domain, user, user group, and role 330
23.5.1 what is domain, user, user group, and role 331
23.5.2 Manage Users and user groups on the glassfish server 333
23.5.3 set security role 334
23.5.4 map roles to users and user groups 335
23.6 use SSL to establish a secure connection 336
23.6.1 verify and configure SSL 337
23.6.2 use digital certificate 337
23.7 more information about security 339
Chapter 2 Web Application Security 24th
24.1 Web Application Security Overview 341
24.2 increase Web Application Security by 342
24.2.1 set security limit 343
24.2.2 set authentication mechanism 345
24.2.3 declared security role 350
24.3 use a programmatic security mechanism in Web applications 351
24.3.1 implement user authentication by programming 351
24.3.2 check the initiator identity programmatically 353
24.3.3 sample code for programming Security 353
24.3.4 declare and associate role reference 354
24.4 example of adding security to Web applications 355
24.4.1 example of using basic authentication in servlet 356
24.4.2 example 359 of using form authentication mechanism in JSF
Chapter 2 Enterprise Application Security 25th
25.1 add security 363 for enterprise beans
25.1.1 adding 365 security for enterprise beans using declarative Methods
25.1.2 increase the security of Enterprise beans by 369 by programming
25.1.3 run-as 370
25.1.4 deploy enterprise Bean 371 with security reinforcement
25.2 example of adding security to enterprise Bean 371
25.2.1 example 371 of adding security to enterprise Bean by using declarative Method
25.2.2 example 375 of adding security to enterprise Bean by programming
25.3 add security 377 to the application Client
25.3.1 use login module 377
25.3.2 use a programmatic user to log on to 378
25.4 increased security for enterprise information system applications by 378
25.4.1 log on to container management 378
25.4.2 component management login 379
25.4.3 configure resource adapter Security 379
Part 8 Java EE Support Technology
Chapter 2 Java EE support technology 26th
26.1 transactions 384
26.2 Resource 384
26.2.1 Java EE connector framework and resource adapter 384
26.2.2 Java Message Service API 385
26.2.3 Java database connection software 385
Chapter 4 Transactions 27th
27.1 what is transaction 386
27.2 container-hosted transactions 387
27.2.1 transaction property 387
27.2.2 roll back container-hosted transactions 390
27.2.3 synchronization Session Bean instance variable 390
27.2.4 method not allowed in container hosting transactions 391
27.3 bean hosting transactions 391
27.3.1 JTA transaction 392
27.3.2 if not submitted, 392 is returned.
27.3.3 method not allowed in bean hosting transactions 392
27.4 transaction timeout 392
27.5 update data in multiple databases 393
27.6 transactions in Web Components 394
27.7 more information about transactions 394
Chapter 2 Resource connection 28th
28.1 resource and JNDI name 395
28.2 datasource object and connection pool 396
28.3 resource injection 397
28.3.1 field-level injection 398
28.3.2 method-level injection 398
28.3.3 class-level injection 399
28.4 Resource adapter and contract 399
28.4.1 management contract 400
28.4.2 general work context contract 401
28.4.3 outward-oriented and introverted contract 401
28.5 Metadata Annotation 402
28.6 public client interface 404
28.7 reference resource 404

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